Vehicle theft affects you.

When vehicle theft rates rise in Illinois, so do insurance premiums.
Since 1991, the Illinois Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Council has reduced vehicle theft in Illinois by 77%.
The reduction in vehicle theft equals savings in your pocket.

Since 1991:

Criminal Investigations
Initiated

Audits of vehicle-related
businesses

Violation letters issued
to audited businesses

Arrests
Made

Convictions
obtained

Stolen vehicles recovered

$342 million saved.

MVTPC Council members:

  • Kimberly M. Foxx, Cook County State’s Attorney
  • Brian B. Fengel, Chief, Bartonville Police Department
  • Eddie T. Johnson, Superintendent, Chicago Police Department
  • Larry D. Johnson, Farmers Insurance
  • Leo Schmitz, Director, Illinois State Police
  • Jesse White, Illinois Secretary of State

Grant Review Committee members:

  • John Brassil, Representative for Kimberly M. Foxx, Cook County State’s Attorney
  • Kathleen Boehmer, Chicago Police Department
  • Brian B. Fengel, Chief, Bartonville Police Department
  • Sydney Roberts - Representative for Jesse White, Director, Secretary of State, Department of Police

Welcome to the Illinois Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Council

The mission of the Illinois MVTPC is to reduce vehicle theft, insurance fraud, and motor vehicle theft-related crimes in Illinois. In 1991, the General Assembly established the Illinois Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Council, an 11-member coalition of representatives from the insurance industry, state’s attorneys, and law enforcement officers. It is private and public partnership effectively combating motor vehicle theft and related crimes in Illinois. The Illinois Compiled Statute (20 ILCS 4005/) that allows the Council to exercise its powers, duties, and responsibilities can be downloaded here.

Vehicle theft in Illinois has dropped nearly 77 percent since 1991, when the Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Act was passed by the General Assembly. From 1991 to 2014, the annual number of stolen vehicles decreased from 75,642 to 17,563.This has resulted in a projected savings of more than $340 million in property losses.

Grant funds awarded by the Council have improved motor vehicle theft law enforcement by establishing and supporting multi-jurisdictional task forces, investigative teams, and other anti-theft efforts throughout the state.

Why the MVTPC Matters
  • Vehicle theft is changing1/6

    While auto theft used to conjure images of dark parking lots, broken glass, “peeled” steering columns, and a quick get-away car theft and related crimes have grown much more sophisticated. Today’s Council-funded task forces focus on organized crime, “black markets” involving essential auto parts, identity theft, and costly insurance fraud.
  • Savings on insurance premiums2/6

    Insurance premiums are based on risk factors. A rise of vehicle theft rates in Illinois means the risk to insure a vehicle is higher, thus we all pay through higher insurance rates. Since the Council’s inception in 1991, with various Council initiatives working across the state, vehicle theft is down 77 percent. The reduction in vehicle theft helps stabilize insurance premiums.
  • Crime deterrent3/6

    A correlation exists between motor vehicle theft and other criminal activity like organized crime. Stolen vehicles are often used to commit and perpetrate other crimes. The Council’s focus on theft prevention, leads to reduction of coinciding crimes in Illinois.
  • Safer communities and peace of mind4/6

    In addition to the disruption in daily routine, consequences for people victimized by vehicle theft include unplanned expenses, wage and/or employment loss, increased premiums, and the devastation of becoming a victim. Such thefts also lead to increased automobile accidents and property damage. Fewer vehicle thefts means there are fewer criminals, fewer victims, and safer communities.
  • Reduced identity theft5/6

    Vehicle thefts victims are at heightened risk of identity theft. The contents of your vehicle reveal personal information about yourself and provide an opportunity for identity theft. This information could be used to impersonate you.
  • Reduced stolen vehicle market6/6

    Reduced vehicle theft leads to decreasing sales of stolen used vehicles and parts. Buying stolen cars and parts can create serious legal and financial consequences for unsuspecting buyers. In addition to losing the money used to purchase the vehicle, buyers can be prosecuted for car theft if they knew the vehicle or parts were stolen.

Meeting Dates & Locations

2017 Grant Review Committee Meeting Schedule

Scheduled Date: Location: Time: Alternate Date:
TBD     TBD
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2017 Council Meeting Schedule

Scheduled Date: Location: Time: Alternate Date:
Wednesday, February 22, 2017 ICJIA offices 300 W. Adams, Chicago, IL, 60606, Suite 200 10 A.M. Wednesday, March 1, 2017
Wednesday, May 17, 2017 ICJIA offices 300 W. Adams, Chicago, IL, 60606, Suite 200 10 A.M. Wednesday, May 24, 2017
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 ICJIA offices 300 W. Adams, Chicago, IL, 60606, Suite 200 10 A.M. Wednesday, August 23, 2017
Wednesday, November 8, 2017 ICJIA offices 300 W. Adams, Chicago, IL, 60606, Suite 200 10 A.M. Wednesday, November 15, 2017

News & Publications

NEW Statewide Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Strategy 2016 - 2019

A statewide motor vehicle theft prevention strategy centered on expert opinion, data analyses, public input and the effectiveness of funded programs is adopted by the Council every four years. The strategy describes the nature and extent of vehicle theft in Illinois, regions where the problem is greatest, particular problems that the Council should focus on, and the types of programs that should be supported.

MVTPC FY2015 Annual Report

The Illinois Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Council 2015 Annual Report describes the Council’s achievements and challenges over the past year. The Council’s partnership of public and private sectors is effectively fighting vehicle theft in Illinois.

2016 Annual Insurance Assessment

The Illinois Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Act (20 ILCS 4005/1 et seq) took effect January 1, 1991, creating the Illinois Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Council. The Act requires all insurance companies licensed to write private passenger vehicle insurance coverage in Illinois that are included in Class 2 and Class 3 of Section 4 of the Illinois Insurance Code to annually pay into the special trust fund $1 for each earned car year of exposure for physical damage (comprehensive) insurance coverage written during the calendar year.